Emma Cocker is a writer-artist based in Sheffield and Associate Professor in Fine Art, Nottingham Trent University. Emma's research focuses on artistic processes and practices, and the performing of ‘thinking-in-action’ therein. Her practice unfolds restlessly along the threshold between writing/art, including experimental, performative and collaborative approaches, alongside a mode of ‘contiguous writing’ — a way of writing-with that seeks to touch upon rather than being explicitly about. Her writing is published in Failure, 2010; Stillness in a Mobile World, 2010; Drawing a Hypothesis: Figures of Thought, 2011; Hyperdrawing: Beyond the Lines of Contemporary Art, 2012; Reading/Feeling, 2013; On Not Knowing: How Artists Think, 2013; Choreo-graphic Figures: Deviations from the Line, 2017; The Creative Critic: Writing as/about Practice, and the solo collection, The Yes of the No, 2016. More recently, Emma trained to be a qualified yoga teacher, interested in how a heightened awareness of the body and breath, alongside meditation and attention practices, might be integrated into art-writing, artistic practice, pedagogy and research.

Exhibition: THE STARS LOOK SO DIFFERENT TONIGHT


Exhibition at Fotogalerie Wien
from 29.01.2019 to 02.03.2019
Andreas Müller, Anthony Carr, Nikolaus Gansterer (in collaboration with Emma Cocker), Sheung Yiu, William Mokrynski, Anja Nowak
  
The chosen title, The Stars Look So Different Tonight, can be understood as a metaphor for marvelling, the starting point of the human thirst for knowledge. The artist positions here have in common a subjective approach to fundamental questions of nature as well as being investigative regarding perceptual processes and visualization strategies. Their poetic and sensual appropriation of scientific pictorial language, enriched with fictitious or hyperrealist stagings and speculative laboratories, opens up a fresh look at the familiar. The sober, objective methodologies of natural science are contrasted with experimental, sometimes playful, approaches that recognise and accept the ambivalences and mysteries of the objects under investigation.